Happy NAT Graduates

Congratulations! to our most recent American Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) graduates in Minnesota. Family and friends turned out to celebrate this achievement on December 30, 2014. Also, potential employers were on-hand to share information about their work places and to meet the graduates who are future caregivers.

DSC_4412NAT graduates display their new American Red Cross certificates.

DSC_4371NAT graduate Lizbeth Perez visits with a healthcare provider during the job fair.

DSC_4374Hayet Chalbe (l) celebrated with her daughter Zohra on graduation day.

DSC_4379NAT student Erica Parker was one of 7 graduates from Red Cross NAT on December 30.

DSC_4388NAT instructor Yelena McCormick reads Oh, the Places You’ll Go by Dr. Suess.

DSC_4364NAT graduate Trevor Brown gets employer information from a healthcare provider.

DSC_4403NAT coordinator Kimberly Fullmer offers congratulations to student Jordin Melchert.

The American Red Cross is the premier provider of Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) and has prepared individuals for work in the nursing field for over 100 years. The program is designed with input from educators, caregivers, and long-term industry representatives from across the United States. To learn more, click here.

All photos, credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Red Cross Trains Roosevelt High’s First, First Responder Teens

Story and photos by Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Roosevelt High School student Kalia Vang, 17, is one of 11 youth who successfully complete the school’s first American Red Cross Emergency Medical Response (EMR) course. She received her course certificate from the Red Cross on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 in Minneapolis. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross
Roosevelt High School student Kalia Vang, 17, is one of 11 youth who completed the school’s first American Red Cross Emergency Medical Response (EMR) course. She received her course certificate from the Red Cross on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 in Minneapolis. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Preparing people to respond to emergencies is one thing the American Red Cross does –and does well. Now, eleven Roosevelt High School teens are ready to help save lives after successfully completing Red Cross Emergency Medical Response (EMR) training.

The students received their course certificates during a ceremony at the high school on October 28. Minneapolis VIPs on-hand included Mayor Betsy Hodges, Fire Chief John Fruetel and Superintendent Bernadeia Johnson.

All partner representatives are very thankful for the Red Cross and its work to help the Minneapolis fire department engage with local youth, prepare teens for fire fighting and healthcare careers after graduation, and add diversity to the fire department so that it better represents the community it serves. “Without the Red Cross we would not have gone as far as we have,” says Fire Chief John Fruetel.

Also present to celebrate with the students and city officials was Red Cross instructor Steven Brown who taught the EMR course to the students. “When Steve was hired on as the instructor, I was confident that the students would be able to build a solid foundation of knowledge with Steve as their instructor,” says Kari Anderson Slade, Health Careers Program Coordinator at Roosevelt High School.

Minneapolis, Minn., Mayor Betsy Hodges thanks American Red Cross Emergency Medical Response (EMR) Instructor Steven Brown for successful EMR training of the first Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) youth group at Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis, on Tuesday, October 28, 2014. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross
Minneapolis, Minn., Mayor Betsy Hodges thanks American Red Cross Emergency Medical Response (EMR) Instructor Steven Brown for successful EMR training of the first Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) youth group at Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis, on Tuesday, October 28, 2014. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

As the instructor for this part of their first responder training, Brown had the honor of giving the teens their course certificates. “Steve has been extremely thoughtful about his role as a teacher of EMR this fall, but has also gone beyond this to recognize the importance of EMR, in the scope of the EMT program students are taking,” says Anderson Slade.

From here, the teens move on to the second half their training with Hennepin Technical College, which will prepare them to become certified Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs).

That is, of course, if they pass the test. If their current dedication and enthusiasm serves as an indicator of success, then they’ll likely get all As.

Click here to learn more about American Red Cross healthcare and public safety training and certification programs.