Disaster affects mental health, too

Photo by Daniel Cima/American Red Cross

Disasters can be devastating and extremely stressful for those impacted. Disasters can force people from their homes. For some, disaster will claim everything they own.  The American Red Cross offers these steps for people to take care of their emotional health as well as that of their family members and friends during disaster recovery, and everyday.

How you may be feeling

  • Feel physically and mentally drained
  • Have difficulty making decisions or
  • staying focused on topics
  • Become easily frustrated on a frequent basis
  • Argue more with family and friends
  • Feel tired, sad, numb, lonely or worried
  • Experience changes in appetite or sleep patterns
  • Most of these reactions are temporary and will go away over time. Try to accept whatever reactions you may have.
  • Look for ways to take one step at a time and focus on taking care of your disaster-related needs and those of your family.

What you can do

  • Take care of your safety. Find a safe place to stay and make sure your physical health needs and those of your family are addressed.
  • Seek medical attention if necessary.
  • Eat healthy.
  • Get some rest.
  • Stay connected with family and friends. Giving and getting support is one of the most important things you can do
  • Be patient with yourself and with those around you.
  • Recognize that everyone is stressed and may need some time to put their feelings and thoughts in order.
  • Set priorities. Tackle tasks in small steps.
  • Gather information about assistance and resources that will help you and your family members meet your disaster-related needs.

Signs you may need additional support

Many people feel better after a few days. Others find that their stress does not go away as quickly as they would like and it influences their relationships with their family, friends and others. If you find yourself or a loved one experiencing some of the feelings and reactions listed below for 2 weeks or longer, this may be a sign that you need to reach out for additional assistance.

  • Crying spells or bursts of anger
  • Difficulty eating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Losing interest in things
  • Increased physical symptoms such as headaches or stomachaches
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling guilty, helpless or hopeless
  • Avoiding family and friends
Photo by Daniel Cima/American Red Cross

Children and Disasters

Children experience traumatic events differently from adults. Experiencing a disaster can leave children feeling frightened, confused and insecure, particularly if this experience is not their first. Because they can’t always talk about their worries, it sometimes comes out in a child’s behavior. Some may react immediately; others may be fine for weeks or months, and then show troubling behavior. Knowing the signs that are common at different ages can help parents recognize problems and respond accordingly.

They may be more agitated or act out. They may be more clingy or cry often. They may need more attention or reassurance from adults they trust. Scary memories become attached to the sounds, sights and smells that happen at the time of the experience. It’s important to remind children that they are remembering the scary thing that happened; that it’s not happening now.

Here are a few tips for talking to children after a traumatic event:

  • Provide children with opportunities to talk
  • Don’t be afraid to admit you don’t have all the answers
  • Allow kids to discuss their fears and concerns
  • Answer questions appropriate for their age.

Additional resources
Contact your local Red Cross Disaster Mental Health or community mental health professional. Please seek immediate help if you or someone you know is feeling that life isn’t worth living or if you are having thoughts of harming yourself or others. You can also contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.

Disaster preparedness? Easier than it sounds.

Steve with his daughter Sophie — who’s going to be a first-time driver next year and already has an emergency kit.

Personal experiences push forth the importance of being prepared. Take Twin Cities resident Steve Davis who experienced the 1996 snow storm that brought Philadelphia to a standstill. He laughingly recounts “perhaps I was the only one in Philly who had a shovel on that cold, freezing night.” Stuck in slush and not any help in the offing, Steve’s kit came to his rescue.

Steve always carries an emergency kit in his car, a habit instilled in him since his late teens by his father. Perhaps Steve’s dad knew, like we do, that disaster can happen to anyone, anytime and anywhere. Being proactive helps lessen the impact of emergencies during times of adversity.

The good news is that preparing is easier than it sounds. These three steps will get you going:

We urge everyone to be proactive when it comes to disaster preparedness. Your readiness helps you, your loved ones, and in many cases your neighbors, especially those who are especially vulnerable. Resist waiting until an emergency occurs because by then it can be too late to help.

By Sohini Sarkar, American Red Cross

Trucks roll in for GPS hardware upgrade

Response trucks from around the upper Midwest are rolling in to the American Red Cross in Minneapolis. The trucks are getting GPS hardware that allows for live tracking during relief efforts.

Live tracking will be especially helpful when trucks are bringing aid to remote areas. “They’ll be able to find us,” says Earl, a volunteer based in Wisconsin.

Earl became a volunteer after seeing the Red Cross helping people during Hurricane Charley in 2004. “Before that I didn’t give to the Red Cross,” says Earl. “During Charley I saw the other side.”

Earl was on the road for 100 days in 2016 and 60 days in 2017 bring disaster relief to people in need. This included after heavy flooding in Louisiana.

There, he found himself nearly trapped by rising high water on a rural road. “I realized I couldn’t get through,” says Earl about reaching a swamp area unexpectedly in a parish near Baton Rouge.

His childhood on a farm, he says, calms any fear he might have in tough situations. Simply, he’s a volunteer because he says, “I enjoy this.”

Story and photos by Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Smoke alarms are first line of defense to fight fires

By Kathleen Todd for the American Red Cross Minnesota Region

American Red Cross Minnesota Region smoke alarm installation, 2015.

When Suzie Olson of Saint Paul had a recent American Red Cross Home Fire Campaign visit, she had a big surprise.

“None of my smoke alarms actually worked. While I thought I had been on top of changing the batteries, my smoke detectors were so old that the smoke alarm itself was completely nonfunctional,” Olson says.  “I thought I had been so responsible about it.”

Olson took the first step to detecting a fire and now she wants others to take action. And the Red Cross wants to ensure that every household has working smoke alarms.

Please check the alarms in your home to see if they’re working. If not, replace the batteries or the alarms. The Red Cross can help you do this. Our Home Fire Campaign makes it possible for the Red Cross to install free smoke alarms that will help save lives during home fires.

Multi-unit apartment building fire, Robbinsdale, MN, 2016. Photo by Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

The American Red Cross responds on average 60,000 disasters each year in the United Sates – and the vast majority of these are home fires. Since 2014, the Red Cross, in partnership with fire departments and other local groups, has visited homes and installed over a million free smoke alarms nationwide. Through these efforts, the Red Cross has saved over 250 lives.

In 2016, 43 Minnesotans lost their lives in fires. In 33 percent of the residential casualties, smoke alarms were absent or non-operating.

To request a smoke alarm installation for your home, community members can call 612-871-7676 or visit getasmokealarm.org. Appointments typically take 20-30 minutes.

Minnesota fire statistics provided by Minnesota State Fire Marshal

Minnesota woman honors parents while helping her country

Red Cross volunteer Dun Bui talks with a Hurricane Irma survivor at the Red Cross shelter in Estero, Florida. Photo credit: Daniel Cima for the American Red Cross

Dun Bui is following the example of her mother and father by supervising an American Red Cross shelter for people in Estero, Florida, affected by Hurricane Irma. “Mom and Dad did charity work back home (in Vietnam),” she says.

Though they live in the United States, Dun’s parents went back to Vietnam to buy food and water to help an orphanage and others in need. “That’s what they did in the past so I thought it would be a wonderful idea to do,” she says. “America’s my home, so I want to volunteer here.”

A volunteer from the Twin Cities Chapter of the Red Cross in Minnesota, Dun has been working as night supervisor in a shelter for more than 450 displaced people, making sure people temporarily living there have food and other services – “that everything that’s needed is available and ready.” She also translates for those who speak Vietnamese and need disaster relief.

She started with the Red Cross after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, took a break for a while and then reactivated, deploying to help last year after flooding in North Carolina. Dun is one of more than 2,700 Red Cross workers who are responding to Irma. “Giving back to the community … really inspires me,” she says.

Story by Pauline Jelinek. Click here to learn more about the Red Cross response to hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.

Red Cross Kicks Off Minnesota Centennial with Open House Success

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Historical dress-up photo booth. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Story by Red Cross volunteer Tara Niebeling

Thursday, January 19 marked the first of many events in a year-long centennial celebration for the America Red Cross Minnesota Region. Volunteers from across the state gathered to display, experience and share in the huge variety of services the American Red Cross provides to Minnesotans and across the globe. From a visual history of the iconic Red Cross pin to an interactive refugee camp simulation, hundreds of guests took themselves on a self-guided tour through 100 years of rich Red Cross history.

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CPR demonstration. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

All three floors of the Minnesota region’s headquarters were buzzing with excitement for this milestone. One of my first stops was to learn about fire preparedness. “In my experience, more than half of the fires I responded to were caused by grease pans,” said Meredith Lindley, DAT volunteer for more than a year. “People know candles or kids playing with matches are top causes, but the grease pan in your oven is more dangerous than you’d think.” You can bet I went home and cleaned my grease pan that night!

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Emergency Response Vehicle talk. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

I then headed to the garage to check out the ERV, or the Emergency Response Vehicle, to get a sneak peek into what the Red Cross road warriors experience when delivering relief all over the country. Red Cross volunteer Richard Underdahl-Pierce answered all our questions about the truck, how many meals it can bring to those in need and how often the truck is in action.

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Blood pressure check in the Nurse Assistant Training classroom. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

“Tonight we are celebrating what the Red Cross has been over the past 100 years, but also what we’re doing today and what we’re doing going forward in our communities,” said Phil Hansen, CEO of the America Red Cross Minnesota Region. “Reaching this 100-year milestone proves that our mission really resonates with people and continues to do so.”

Centennial celebrations throughout the year include a Dancing with the Stars in Mankato, a celebratory breakfast to recognize corporate and foundation partners, volunteer recognition events, a signature Heroes Awards and Centennial Gala and more. See a complete list of the celebrations and how you can get involved here.

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Historical trunk used for Services to Armed Forces. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

My many conversations throughout the evening yielded a clear conclusion. The Red Cross has maintained the agility over the years to be flexible according to the needs of the American people. In Minnesota, as those needs have changed and evolved over the past 100 years, so have the programs offered by the organization. This centennial celebration is an opportunity to look back and appreciate how the organization has served the people

Click here to learn more about the American Red Cross Centennial Celebration. 

86-year-old Red Cross volunteer shows no sign of slowing down

Story by Karen Scullin, FOX9 News

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Vonnie Thomas, image provided courtesy of Fox9

Vonnie Thomas has spent virtually her entire life helping others through the American Red Cross and the National Sports Center for the Disabled. She’s 86 years old and shows no signs of stopping.

Thomas started volunteering for the Red Cross when she was 18 so she could get a free ticket to the state fair. But, she’s still offering her time and energy to this day and has stockpiled stories that range from highly emotional to simply surprising.

Thomas estimates she’s helped on almost 50 different disasters, from tornadoes and hurricanes to fires and floods. She’s been volunteering with the Red Cross for 65 years, helping with food, clothing and shelter, but also with hugs and understanding – likely the most important assets of all.

“It isn’t what we give, it’s our presence,” Thomas says.

But, Thomas says it’s not the natural disasters that impact her the most, it’s the manmade ones. She was there at the pentagon for 9/11 and the Oklahoma City bombing where a daycare was hit. She’s been back to Oklahoma City a number of times, but can’t bring herself to go to the memorial.

“I get about a block away and I think nope- not quite ready. It’s just that hard because I was right down in there,” Thomas says.

Thomas doesn’t just stop at disasters. The mountains call her every single year. She heads to Winter Park, Colorado, where she volunteers to teach downhill and cross country adaptive skiing to amputees, the blind, those with cerebral palsy, cancer, brain injuries and more.

“They come around and they’re like ‘wow I’m empowered I can do this’,” Thomas says.

Vonnie Thomas and a home fire survivor. Image provided courtesy of the American Red Cross

Thomas is rewarded by the smiles and the self-esteem that emerge from the people she teaches. She shares the story of a young boy with cancer whom she taught to ski. She was so proud of him.

“He said, ‘How come you’re crying?’ I said, ‘I’m not crying my eyes are watering because I don’t have my goggles on’,” she says. “About two weeks later, I got a package in the mail and a note from his mom and it said Jimmy wanted me to have his goggles so my eyes would never water again. He had passed away in the meantime.”

Thomas also volunteers to work with “at risk” youth. Several years ago, she taught a high school boy who showed up in a trench coat to ski and he told her he wished his mom was more like her.

“I said they know everything that’s going on… he said they have no idea what’s going on in the garage. And I didn’t pick up on it,” Thomas recalls.

Two weeks later, Thomas was called to Columbine, Colorado where 13 people were shot and killed. As she was helping families in crisis, she realized her high school ski student was Dylan Klebold, one of the shooters.

“He learned so much,” she said. “I bet if I’d had him another week we would have been okay.”

Thomas says she may be 86, but she doesn’t feel it. She plans to stay on her mission for to help and to heal for years to come.

For more information on how to volunteer with the Red Cross, visit redcross.org/mn and click on “Ways to Help.”

This feature story originally appeared on FOX9 online. The story is published here with permission. 

Making a Difference for our Military Heroes

Stand Down for veterans, Virginia, MN, August 2016
Stand Down for veterans, Virginia, MN, August 2016

By Dan Williams, Executive Director of the American Red Cross Serving Northern Minnesota

During this time of year, Red Cross volunteers in Northern Minnesota are particularly busy supporting Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans (MAC-V) ‘Stand Down’ events, collecting and distributing Holiday Mail for Heroes cards for local military members and veterans, and participating in Veterans Day events. These activities help fulfill our Service to the Armed Forces, which is a core service that the American Red Cross delivers. And, is always an honor to provide.

“It felt like a scoop of ice cream”

At the Veteran Stand Down event in August in Virginia, MN, one of our newest volunteers, Wendy Frederickson, and an experienced disaster relief volunteer, Lisa Kvas, participated in the event as their first time delivering Red Cross services to military members and veterans.  Wendy shared that the best part of participating in Red Cross work with veterans was the privilege to meet a Vietnam War veteran named Richard Krisean, who had never attended a veteran-focused event since returning from Vietnam.

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Richard Krsiean

Richard was a Radar Intercept Officer with the Marines in Vietnam and flew in 192 combat missions.  Wendy shared that Richard’s experience in returning from Vietnam was not positive at all and that Richard was shocked at the depth and breadth of the services that were made available at the event for veterans.

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Richard and Wendy at the Stand Down

Richard shared his point of view: “What I took from going to the Veteran’s Stand Down in Virginia was the openness of all of the organizations, but the Red Cross particularly was so open and helped Veterans break down the barriers of sharing their experiences – in my case in Vietnam.  The Red Cross volunteers Wendy and Lisa were just so open and wanted to know your story, and there were no walls and no barriers, they were just there to help the veterans. That made me a little emotional, which I usually don’t get in front of other people.”

When Richard was asked about his experience with the Red Cross while he was serving in Vietnam, Richard said: “When I was on a medivac flight back from Vietnam, it was so nice to see people like that.  They really cared about me when they were giving me coffee or donuts, and after being shot at in Vietnam and everything else that was going on – it felt like a big scoop of ice cream, that is how I felt.”

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Richard and Wendy talking at the Stand Down

Wendy said that when she was sitting down with Richard for lunch that she told him that “Something is telling my heart that you are the reason I am here today.”  Richard said that he felt the same way.  Lisa Kvas added, “Meeting Richard really struck home to me as to how proud that we really are of all of them.  Showing that, and sharing that, was really much more important than the blanket that we handed them.  That is what has the impact.”  When Lisa was asked about what it might take for a volunteer to be able to make a difference with our Service to the Armed Forces, she shared that it is very similar to the qualities that make a good disaster volunteer – compassion and hope.

This year, we had the added resource of new blankets to give out to the veterans attending the Stand Down events in Virginia, Duluth, Grand Rapids, and Bemidji though a partnership with the Duluth Fire Department. Through a national charity, we were able to give out 1,000 blankets to both veterans at these events, as well as to victims of disaster across our Northern Minnesota Chapter area.

80% of success is ‘showing up’

Our take is that that 80% of success is ‘showing up.’ This means two of the most important pieces of the work we do with our military service members and veterans at the Northern Minnesota Chapter are 1) showing up; and 2) not waiting for our military heroes to raise a hand for help. By making a commitment to being at events that support our military units and veterans, it gives us the opportunity to make a difference when it is needed.

Though programs like Holiday Mail for Heroes, we distribute bundles of holiday cards written by local community members to all of the members of the units we support locally; as well as to all of the veterans living in nursing homes that we supply cards to. The reason is that on any given day it is impossible to identify exactly who would benefit from getting the bundle of cards thanking them for their service and wishing them a great holiday season. By giving the cards to everyone, we are letting our local communities share their appreciation of the commitment our veterans have made. This year we expect to distribute over 16,000 cards.

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UMD Greek Life Club, September 2016

On Veterans Day, we will participate in four events happening in the Duluth area. We will support the Veterans Day parade in downtown Duluth by providing donuts, coffee and hot chocolate for our veterans who will be marching in the parade. We also have card-signing events going on at Bent Paddle Brewing and the College of St. Scholastica hockey game.  Lastly, at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) hockey game, the UMD Greek Life Club will be supporting a card-signing table, and the UMD Athletic Department will recognize our Northern Minnesota Chapter Board Chair (and retired Colonel from the MN Air National Guard) Penny Dieryck, as well as Richard Krsiean, the veteran we met in Virginia, for their service to our nation.

If you are a veteran, please accept our sincerest thanks for your service to our country.  If you would like to get involved with the work of Red Cross Service to Armed Forces, reach out to your local Red Cross chapter to find out how you can help.

Ten Tips for Trick-or-Treat Safety on Halloween

halloween-clip-art-happy-halloween-clip-art-5We’re excited, and you might be too, that Halloween is just around the corner. To ensure Halloween is filled with fun for the trick-or-treaters in your life, review and share the safety tips below. And, download the American Red Cross First Aid App. It’s free and it gives you instant access to information about handling common first aid emergencies.

1. Use only flame-resistant costumes.

2. Plan the trick-or-treat route – make sure adults know where children are going.

3. Have a parent or responsible adult accompany young children as they make their way around the neighborhood.

4. Make sure trick-or-treaters can see and be seen. Give them a flashlight to light their way. Add reflective tape to costumes and trick-or-treat bags. Have everyone wear light-colored clothing to help be seen.

5. Instead of masks which can cover the eyes and make it hard to see, use face paint instead.

6. Be cautious around animals.

7. Only visit homes that have a porch light on. Accept treats at the door – never go inside.

8. Walk only on the sidewalks, not in the street. If no sidewalk is available, walk at the edge of the roadway, facing traffic. Look both ways before crossing the street, and cross only at the corner. Don’t cut across yards or use alleys. Don’t cross between parked cars.

9. Make sure a grown-up checks the goodies before eating. Remove loose candy, open packages and choking hazards. Discard any items with brand names that you are not familiar with.

10. Drivers – use extra caution. The youngsters are excited and may forget to look both ways before crossing.

Have a happy Halloween!

Five steps to take against the flu and other germs

Red Cross volunteers make influenza face masks during the influenza epidemic in 1918. Photo: American Red Cross Photo Library
Red Cross volunteers make germ face masks during the influenza epidemic in 1918. Source: American Red Cross Photo Library

Waa! Waa! Do I have to get a flu shot? No, you don’t have to do anything you don’t really want to do. On the flip side, the annual flu shot is your best protection against influenza (also known as the flu), a contagious respiratory disease caused by different virus strains.

In the United States, the flu season begins every fall and ends every spring. The type of flu people get during this season is called seasonal flu. Flu viruses spread when people who are infected cough or sneeze.

In addition to the annual flu shot, take these five (Sniff! Sniff!) steps to stop spreading germs, including the seasonal flu:

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water
  • Reduce contact with people who are sick
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose with tissues when you cough and sneeze. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow
  • Stay away from others as much as possible when you are sick

Click here for more seasonal flu basics and easy to download checklist and tip sheet for taking care of people with the flu from the Red Cross.
Click here for in-depth resources, including the 2016-17 Flu Season Frequently Asked Questions from the CDC.