30 years of service and still going strong: Nancy McKenney shares her story

“I’ve loved every minute of it,” exclaims Nancy McKenney who has been a Red Cross volunteer for 30 years.

McKenney, from Onida, South Dakota, became a volunteer in 1992 when a friend of hers from Pierre encouraged her to look into it. She joined because she “wanted to help people.”

Since then, McKenney has volunteered on more than 100 local and national disasters – including home fires, floods, wildfires, tornadoes and hurricanes – continuing her quest to help others.  

Nancy McKenney – pictured

“We’re so grateful for Nancy’s 30 years of service with the Red Cross,” says Nick Cluppert, Senior Disaster Program Manager, Red Cross Minnesota and Dakotas Region. “Without dedicated volunteers like Nancy, we would not be able to fulfill our mission. She gives so much of her time and is truly a gift to our organization and the people she helps!”

Nick Cluppert, Senior Disaster Program Manager and Nancy McKenney pictured at a volunteer recognition event held in honor of Nancy’s 30 years of volunteer service, Nov. 14, 2022, in Pierre, South Dakota.

One of McKenney’s most memorable experiences was right after the 9/11 attacks when she was volunteering at a satellite office of the Pentagon. A woman who had lost her mother in the attacks approached her and asked if she had time to talk. “She’d talk and I’d listen – I think she had survivor’s remorse and she was a basket case,” McKenney recalls. “I really think I made a difference and I hope that she was able to get through it.”

Being deployed to Canada in August 2017 to help disaster relief efforts following a wildfire in was McKenney’s favorite deployment with the Red Cross. “I had my passport, so I said sure I’d go.” She helped at the front desk of the Red Cross shelter where she directed people, so they received the services they needed. “The countryside was so beautiful and the people where so gracious and glad to have us there,” she recalls. “It was a wonderful experience – you can’t imagine the smiles and gratefulness of all the of the people we helped.”

Nancy McKenney receiving an appreciation plaque for 30 years of volunteer service from Richard Smith, Executive Director, Red Cross serving central and western South Dakota.

“I’ve gone out about four or five times a year,” says McKenney. Last year alone she was in Texas, New Mexico and New Orleans for weeks at a time. “This year it hasn’t worked out because of some health issues and I’m staying closer to home.”

McKenney continues to make her mark. Although for now she’s no longer going across the country to help, she’s putting her energy and compassion to good use right in South Dakota. She’s meeting with Emergency Managers across the state to keep relationships strong and establish locations for Red Cross shelters if needed in the future. And she’s working with local fire departments to make sure they have working smoke alarms to install in homes without them.

“I enjoy staying busy and talking to everyone – if I had to stay cooped up behind four walls I’d go out of my mind,” McKenney adamantly declares. “I need to do something to help people. I can just imagine all my belongings on the sidewalk after a home fire and not have anyone to turn to. I know I need to help them a little bit.”

She always finds ways to talk about the Red Cross including recruiting others to join her. “If you’re a people person the Red Cross offers lots of volunteer opportunities. I’ve made a lot of friends through the Red Cross – we’re one big family!”

Nancy McKenney celebrating 30 years of volunteering with the American Red Cross.

“I love what I do! Some of us are getting old. We need some young blood – it would make my day if I inspired someone to join the Red Cross!”

Whether you’re a people person like Nancy or prefer to work behind the scenes, the Red Cross has volunteer opportunities for you. Visit redcross.org/givetime to find your fit.

Story by Sue Thesenga, American Red Cross

Saving Lives, Inspiring Others

15-Year-Old Receives National American Red Cross Recognition

Sydney Raley, American Red Cross Certificate of Merit recipient. Photo: American Red Cross

Sydney Raley, a 15-year-old McDonald’s employee in Eden Prairie, had been working a typical Saturday shift at the drive-thru window, when she leaned out to inform a customer that her food was on the way and noticed the customer struggling. The woman was choking on a chicken nugget.

Syndey sprang into action, informing her manager and the customer’s daughter to call 911 and then jumping out the drive-thru window to help the customer by performing an abdominal thrust. She was unsuccessful at first, but with the aid of a bystander she was finally able to dislodge the food and clear the woman’s airway.

Sydney credits the bystander and her first aid training, which she received both at the age of 11 at a Red Cross Babysitting and Child Care training class and at Red Cross CPR and AED training in high school, for the successful save. Knowing how to respond during this type of situation allowed her to stay calm and collected as she completed all the necessary checks and steps to save the customer’s life.

This past month, Syndey received the American Red Cross Certificate of Extraordinary Personal Action for her heroic actions. This is one of the highest awards given by the American Red Cross to an individual who saves or sustains a life by using skill and knowledge learned in a Red Cross Training Services course. It is intended to exemplify the highest degree of concern from one human being for another who is in distress.

Sydney, center, with her parents and brother. Photo: American Red Cross

At the presentation ceremony Sydney was able to reunite with the reporter who first broke her story along with others who helped spread her story and achieve international recognition for her heroism. Many in attendance were able to reflect on the inspirational nature of her actions, including Sydney’s parents who commented on the letters and messages Sydney has received from around the world detailing the hope for humanity that she has instilled in so many.

We are incredibly proud to be able to recognize Sydney with the American Red Cross Certificate of Extraordinary Personal Action and hope that Sydney’s story will continue to inspire others to receive lifesaving training and help others in times of need.

Story by Olivia Wolf, Red Cross volunteer

I didn’t realize how important blood donation was until my dad got sick and needed it.” 

A family honors husband and father who died from cancer

Throughout his life, Ed Sturm from New Ulm, Minnesota was known for his witty one-liners and his unwavering passion to help others. The 68-year-old served in the US Army, worked for New Ulm Manufacturing and Caterpillar, and later was as a truck driver. Sadly, his life ended following a long battle with cancer in 2020.

Ed Sturm

To honor his legacy of helping others, his wife Jean Sturm and daughter Rachel Sturm hosted an American Red Cross blood drive in his memory. Their family and friends rallied to show support – filling all appointment and collecting 35 pints of lifesaving blood.

Jean and Rachel both donated blood in honor of Ed at the drive. Jean, a regular blood donor, reached her 100th donation milestone! They hope the Ed Sturm Memorial Blood Drive becomes an annual event to help pay it forward and build awareness of the need for blood donations to help treat cancer patients like Ed.

Jean and Rachel Sturm donated at the Ed Sturm Memorial Blood Drive (photo submitted).

“Everyone thought this was a great way to remember him because they knew his long journey and how much he struggled. Blood donation is an easy way for people to help others and give more time to another family going through the same situation,” said his daughter.

Sturm was first diagnosed in November 2012 with multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer that affects plasma cells — crowding out the normal plasma cells that help fight infection. After a stem cell transplant in April 2013, Sturm’s cancer went into remission but returned in 2015. In March of 2019, their worst fear came true when Sturm was diagnosed with another form of cancer – myelodysplastic syndrome – where healthy blood cells die in the bone marrow or just after entering the bloodstream.

From March 2019 through March 2020, while trying to deal with the two different cancers, Sturm was in the emergency room multiple times getting blood transfusions because his hemoglobin dropped to dangerously low levels. But there wasn’t always blood on the shelves when he needed it.

I didn’t realize how important blood donation was until my dad got sick and needed it.”  – Rachel Sturm

His wife, Jean Sturm, recalls writing in his Caring Bridge journal in March 2020 that Ed had to wait for blood when donations declined during the pandemic. He was moved to the University of Minnesota Medical Center to help ensure blood products would be more readily available. “Cancer is a very physically & emotionally draining disease and having to worry about blood availability is just one more burden piled on,” she said.

Ed and Jean Sturm at Glacier National Park

In total, Sturm received 72 units of blood and 41 units of platelets. “These transfusions gave him the strength and endurance to withstand the chemotherapy and gave him more time with us,” said his daughter. “It was eye-opening to us that one person would need so much blood. I didn’t realize how important blood donation was until my dad got sick and needed it.”

Pictured from left to right: Ed Sturm, Rachel Sturm (daughter), Brandon (grandson) and Jean Sturm

Blood and platelets play a critical role in the treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases, as well as traumatic injuries. Patients fighting cancer need more blood than patients fighting any other disease, using nearly one-quarter of the nation’s blood supply. Healthy donors are needed to ensure that patients have lifesaving blood products available for cancer treatment, emergencies and everyday medical treatments. 

To support families affected by cancer and help prevent a blood shortage this summer you can book a time to give. Simply download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Story by Sue Thesenga, American Red Cross. Photos provided by Sturm family.

Showing how much has to be done

Photo credit: John Decker/American Red Cross

The photo above, sent from one of our Red Cross volunteers, captures a tiny fraction of the sandbags being used to fight back water rising in the Rainy River watershed (and others) across northern Minnesota since last Friday. These sandbags are filled by community volunteers: families, students, neighbors and out-of-towners. They get thirsty, they get hungry and they get blisters. So, we’re there supporting them with hydration and snacks as well as basic health services – we’re helping the helpers! We’ve been working primarily in International Falls (Koochiching County) and doing deliveries to Lake Kabetogama and surrounding areas (Northern St. Louis County).

FAST FACTS

By end of day today, we’ll have provided since last Friday:

💧 Bottled water: 3,288

✔️ Powerade/Gatorade/BodyArmor: 1,370

🍿 Snacks: 1,942

🍊 Fruit: 392

🚚 Remote distribution of Salvation Army meals: 60 meals

🤕 First aid services at sandbagging location: 96

Many thanks to the great groups below, and to all of our amazing partners, for supporting the flood response – Boise Paper/PCA, Walmart in Virginia, MN, United Way of Northeastern Minnesota, Coca Cola Bottling of International Falls, International Falls Hockey Arena, and Cub Foods Duluth. You’re the best! 🤩

May is Military Appreciation Month

As part of our Service to the Armed Forces (SAF) activities, we’re proud to celebrate national Military Appreciation Month with service members, veterans and their families.

The American Red Cross has a long history of serving the U.S. military going back to the Civil War. Our founder, Clara Barton, also known as, “the angel of the battlefield,” participated in 16 separate battles during the war.

This proud service to our Armed Forces continues today in our region:

✔️ In April 2022, the Minnesota and Dakotas Region assisted with 56 emergency communications requests. The Red Cross is federally chartered to handle all emergency communications to our active-duty forces.

✔️ In April, we participated in deployment events where 54 military members and their families received much needed resiliency training. The Red Cross provides much needed resiliency training to deploying units and their families.

✔️ We also follow up with family members of deployed service members. In April, for example, 240 critical community service cases were completed.

🤗 These services happen only with the outstanding efforts of our SAF volunteers. We’d like to share our profound thanks to them for their generosity of time, kindness and expertise. You’re the best!

📷 This May, Red Cross youth volunteers delivered messages of gratitude and Girl Scout cookies at Veterans Affairs clinics in Hibbing, MN and Superior, WI and to VA homes in Silver Bay and Fergus Falls. Photo credit: Dan Williams/American Red Cross

“We need more Annas in the world”

Many Red Crossers are committed to changing the world – one community, one person at a time. That is exactly what Anna Sieben’s mission was.

Sadly, Anna passed away unexpectedly on September 3, 2021, following complications from severe pneumonia.

Anna Sieben
1990 – 2021

To honor Anna’s legacy of making a difference, and her passion for the lifesaving mission of the American Red Cross, her friends and family have organized a blood drive in her memory on May 20, 2022, at Crossroads Church in Hastings, Minn. where Anna attended.

Throughout her life Anna had unwavering passion for helping others. “She was 110% about helping other people regardless of whether she knew you well or if you were a stranger,” said her best friend, Alea Gaughn, who’s helping to organize the blood drive in memory of Anna. “Anyone who knew Anna knew that she had three passions in life: her son Afton, living a healthy lifestyle and helping others.”

Anna and son Afton

Before Anna became a Red Cross employee, she worked at a nursing home. “Anna showed so much passion for the residents there – it was her calling to help others,” says Alea.

In 2019, Anna joined the Red Cross in the biomedical services scheduling department. Her spirit of giving and passion for helping others was quickly evident by her enthusiasm to host blood drives at several of her church’s campuses and volunteer at an annual Christmas Eve blood drive sponsored by the Red Cross.

“Anna was a shining light,” said Dee Carlson, manager of the scheduling department and Anna’s supervisor. “It was amazing to witness how she carried the mission of the Red Cross through everything she did. She made an impact on me, and our entire team, that will change us forever. Not a day goes by that I don’t think of her – I miss her sweet smiles, her silly moments and her infectious laugh.”

Anna touched many at the Red Cross. Co-workers across departments enjoyed working with her.

“Anna was a beautiful person,” said Nicole Perlstein, donor recruitment account manager. “To me, she was a one in million type of gal! Anna deeply loved the lifesaving mission of the Red Cross, and I appreciated her passion to help in the community as a blood program leader.” 

Cathy Stapel, a donor recruitment account manager, recalls that Anna always had a glow about her and a smile on her face.

Selflessly, Anna volunteered at Red Cross blood drives including the annual St. James Thanksgiving Day blood drive. She brought homemade cookies to share with blood donors when they finished their donations (pre-Covid). Her son Afton volunteered too, handing out pumpkin pies. “I could tell she adored Afton and I remember thinking how nice it was that she gave up her holiday to help and got him involved in giving back,” said Cathy.  

Anna and Red Crossers Amber Swing and Cathy Stapel at the annual St. James Thanksgiving Day blood drive

Anna, an avid blood donor herself, encouraged her friends and family to donate blood regularly, and many continue as an ongoing tribute to her. “Anna impacted so many lives in such a positive way – she taught us how important it was to give back,” said Alea. “Anna would be so proud to have us donate blood in her name. My wish is for everyone to gather to roll up a sleeve one more time for Anna!”

Anna was a dedicated blood donor and encouraged others to donate

All appointments have been filled for the May 20 blood drive being held in memory of Anna. Those who want to donate in Anna’s honor are welcome to make an appointment to donate at other blood drive locations by downloading the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Story by Sue Thesenga /American Red Cross. Photos courtesy Alea Gaughn

Local Disaster Relief Rolling Snapshot – 2022

When the worst happens, we’re there. After disasters, mostly home fires in our region, Red Cross volunteers work with fire departments and other response partners to connect with families and support needs like emergency lodging, financial assistance and emotional support.

We’d like to share our deepest gratitude with our volunteers for their abiding devotion to helping people rebuild their lives after devastating home fires.

January

🔥 Our winter home fire season continued to disrupt lives during this difficult time. In January across the Minnesota & Dakotas Region, our disaster relief volunteers responded to 115+ home fires, helping 560+ people.

February

🔥 Across our three-state region during February, we responded to 90+ home fires and helped 290+ people affected by these fires. Help us change these statistics. Learn what to do before, during and after a fire! Visit redcross.org/mndaks for fire prevention and safety tips! #endhomefires

March

🔥 During March, our Disaster Action Team was as busy as ever helping people affected by the devastation and trauma that a home fire brings. Across our region, comprised of South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota, our relief workers (90% volunteers) responded to nearly 80 home fires and helped 300+ adults and children. Some families were displaced for a short period of time while others needed to find new housing. Many thanks to all for being there for people when they needed you the most.

April

🔥 During April, responding to help people affected by flooding, freezing weather, home fires and even a tornado in Taopi, MN, filled the hands of our disaster services volunteers. Our trained volunteers supported 60+ disasters and helped 225+ people. Their efforts included working with local partners to support shelters in northwest Minnesota and western North Dakota. Thank you to everyone, especially our volunteers, for stepping up to help people when they needed you the most.

May

🔥 Our trained disaster responders (90% volunteers) responded to 70+ home fires and helped 260+ people.

June

🔥 Home fire relief doesn’t take a summer break. Our trained disaster responders (90% volunteers) helped around 100 people affected by nearly 430 home fires.

July

🔥 Home fires continue this summer throughout our three-state region. Our trained disaster responders (90% volunteers) helped more than 260 people affected by nearly 70 home fires. More trained volunteers are needed to serve on local “Disaster Action Teams” who help people affected by disasters. Apply here.

August

Most of us have not lost a home to fire in the middle of the night. Those who have know the uncertainty that such a disaster can bring. In August, our disaster responders helped more than 300 people affected more than 70 disasters, nearly all home fires, in our three-state region. More than 90 percent of our responders are volunteers. Thank you for your ongoing commitment to supporting people during terrible times in their lives.

September

Our region responds to multiple home fires every day. These are mostly fires affecting single-family dwellings. This month, our Disaster Action Team workers (more than 90% volunteers) supported 71 home fires and helped 325 adults and children. We encourage everyone to practice home fire safety and have a plan. Find helpful resources here.

October

This month was on par with September for home fires responses across our region. Our trained Disaster Action Team responders helped 280 people affected by 77 home fires, including several multi-family fires. More trained volunteers are needed in local communities. Click here to find opportunities in your area.

You Can Help

DONATE – Thanks to donations, our services are free and available for all those in need. Visit here to support our lifesaving work.

VOLUNTEER – The need is constant to help families affected by home fires and other disasters. Click here to become a volunteer.

“The Essential Meaning of Resolve”

The online Merriam-Webster dictionary has several meanings for the verb ‘to resolve’. We’re most interested in number two.

This time of year, many people reflect back and look ahead, taking stock, so-to-speak, of gains, losses, regrets, successes and failures during the past year, and then planning ahead for change: how they want to be or what they want to do (or not do) going forward.

They ‘resolve’ to do things differently. They, like the second definition of the verb in Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, decide “to make a definite and serious decision to do something”. With that in mind, resolutions appear to be earnest undertakings requiring at times deep effort and commitment, resiliency to work through or overcome obstacles on the way to fulfillment and, perhaps most of all, offer profound feelings of purpose once accomplished.

We encourage these undertakings even during times of great challenge like, for example, a global pandemic. As you prepare your list of resolutions for 2022, we ask that you consider taking up one or more of those listed below and making your choices a habit in the new year and the years ahead. We promise to be there with you all the way – sleeves up, hearts open, all in.

Volunteers make up 90 percent of our Red Cross workforce. New dedicated and trained volunteers are always needed to maintain response capacity for providing disaster relief, delivering lifesaving blood, supporting military families during crisis, and other critical roles. In-person and virtual opportunities are available in multiple lines of humanitarian services. We’ll train you and together we’ll do the rest. Become a Red Cross volunteer.

Blood donations are needed every day to help patients. This could be a patient who needs around 100 units following a car accident or a patient in cancer treatment or sickle cell crisis who needs transfusions to continue treatment or ease debilitating pain. Platelets are also essential, especially for people in chemo treatment. We provide nearly 40 percent of the nation’s blood supply. This essential service relies on regular donors. Become a Red Cross blood and/or platelet donor.

Money, as they say, doesn’t grow on trees. (Thankfully, because we much prefer leaves on trees.) Every dollar counts when it comes to providing relief following tornadoes, hurricanes, other natural disasters and home fires. We’re proud that an average of 90 cents of every dollar we spend is invested in delivering care and comfort to those in need. We see first-hand the gratitude from those who welcome help when they need it most. Become a Red Cross supporter.

For inspiration, we turn to Suzanne Sudmeier, one of our disaster health services volunteers. Reflecting upon Clara Barton, our American Red Cross founder who was born 200 years ago, Suzanne she feels honored to continue Clara’s legacy of easing the suffering of others.

I am always in awe of people who have the foresight, courage and energy to be trailblazers for the sake of humanity. Certainly, Clara Barton is one of those people. I can only imagine the personal sacrifice she took upon herself to be true to her principles and vision.
I live such a comfortable life – even when deployed we cannot compare any of our discomforts to those she must have faced. I honestly do not know if I could ever do what she did – but I am privileged to be a follower.

– Suzanne Sudmeier, Red Cross disaster health services volunteer and registered nurse based in central Minnesota

“Without the blood I needed, I may not have survived.”

Crediting blood with saving his life, Bryan Joas advocates for blood donations.

Shauna and Bryan Joas at the March 5, 2021, Joas Strong 5th anniversary blood drive held at Easter Lutheran Church in Eagan, Minn.

While riding his bicycle home from work in 2016, Bryan Joas was involved in a hit-and-run accident. He suffered life-threatening injuries including a broken back, hips and ribs, and damaged lungs, liver, kidney, and intestines. He needed 12 surgeries during his 88-day hospital stay and received nearly 50 transfusions of blood products that helped save his life.

“Without the blood I needed, I may not have survived,” says Bryan. “I’m grateful to blood donors for ensuring there was blood on the shelves when my life was on the line.”

Five years later, Bryan spends little time thinking about the accident or that the vehicle driver has never been found. He chooses to focus on his health, family and replenishing the blood supply that was used to save his life. Bryan and his wife, Shauna, are both advocates for blood donations. “It’s important to me to help pay it forward. I’m living proof that blood helps save lives, and I urge anyone who is able to donate,” says Bryan.

To make an appointment to give blood dowload the Red Cross Blood Donor App or visit RedCrossBlood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS  (1-800-733-2767).

For patients in the emergency room, fighting cancer or facing a life-threatening illness, help can’t wait. Blood donations are essential. Healthy donors are needed now to ensure that patients have lifesaving blood products available for emergency and everyday medical treatments. 

Blood donation safety precautions

To protect the health and safety of Red Cross staff and donors, individuals who do not feel well or who believe they may be ill with COVID-19 should postpone their donation.

Each Red Cross blood drive and donation center follows the highest standards of safety and infection control, and additional precautions – including temperature checks, social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff – have been implemented to help protect the health of all those in attendance. Donors are asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at the drive and are required to wear a face covering or mask while at the drive, in alignment with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention public guidance.  

April is National Volunteer Month

April is National Volunteer Month – the perfect time to give blood, platelets or plasma. There’s no substitute for volunteer donors: Blood cannot be manufactured. In thanks, come to give by 4/30 to be entered for a chance to win a $1,000 e-gift card. Give: rcblood.org/Gift

Story and photo by Sue Thesenga, American Red Cross, Minnesota and Dakotas Region

Self-care tips to keep you happy and healthy this winter

By Vanessa Racine, Canadian Red Cross social media coordinator

Colder temperatures. Less light. Rain, snow. It can sometimes be difficult to stay cheery during the winter in a country like Canada! Some Canadians enjoy the season because it gives them a good excuse – if not forces them – to do something that we tend to neglect: to take time out for ourselves, and ourselves alone.

Refocusing on yourself is extremely important and should regularly be made a priority. It lets you reflect, build your self-esteem, and feel good about yourself. Since we’re at home most of the time, winter is the perfect season to learn how to take time for yourself, live a calmer life, make room for your passions – and discover new ones.

Here are self-care tips to help you stay healthy this winter:

1. Read – one of the best ways to escape and spark your imagination.
2. Do a hands-on activity – knit, paint, sew or tackle a DIY project. Building or creating something with your own two hands can give you a real sense of pride.
3. Take a bubble bath – for even deeper relaxation, pair it with a good book and/or music.
4. Turn your phone all the way off – at least for one day a week.
5. Get involved with an organization that works for a cause that’s important to you — why not with the Red Cross?
6. Get active – whether you opt for something calming or energizing, regular exercise improves your physical and mental well-being.
7. Whip up a homemade hot chocolate – or another little sweet treat for your taste buds.
8. Light candles – the warm glow and fragrance make for the perfect calming atmosphere.
9. Play board games – dig out that old Monopoly set or deck of cards and have a blast rediscovering old classics!
10. Do a face and hair mask once a week – or go all out with an at-home spa day.
11. Sort through your stuff – clean out your closets! Throwing away, selling, or donating items does wonders and helps you feel more at home, since your space is less cluttered.
12. Cook up a homemade meal – from the cuisine of your choice, prepared with love from start to finish.
13. Learn a language – even if it’s just the basics of a language you’ve always dreamed of learning. It’s good to challenge yourself in a healthy way, and best of all, it’s useful.
14. Make a list – of fashion, travel, positive thoughts… it doesn’t matter what the list is about, just as long as it motivates and inspires you.
15. Put on some music and dance.

I hope that you’ll draw inspiration from these self-care tips and take care of yourself on the daily. And don’t forget, stress is a part of modern life and is a normal reaction to change. To limit the harmful effects of stress on your mental or physical health, it’s important to learn to live a healthy lifestyle, and if needed, to not hesitate to ask loved ones or health professionals for help. Doing so will make you more likely to stay zen!

For more well-being resources, click here and here. By the way, a near identical version of this post originally appeared on the Canadian Red Cross blog, which means this post is published here with permission from the Canadian Red Cross. Thank you!

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