Hurricane Matthew: How The Red Cross Is Helping

The storm hit in the early morning, just after midnight, says Stephanie Hughes on the porch of her home while speaking with a Red Cross relief worker in Pembroke, Georgia. They were very scared especially, she says, when trees started to come down and water started rising around the house, which has been in her family for generations. October, 8, 2016. Photo credit: Daniel Cima/American Red Cross
The storm arrived in the early morning, just after midnight, says Stephanie Hughes on the porch of her home while speaking with a Red Cross relief worker in Pembroke, Georgia. They were especially scared, she says, when trees started to come down and water started rising around the house, which has been in her family for generations. October, 8, 2016. Photo credit: Daniel Cima/American Red Cross

Hurricane Matthew. Thousands of people in shelters. Thousands of relief workers responding. Too many lives lost. This disaster is a big one, for all of us, requiring many hands, heads, and hearts pulling together to help others in dire need. Shelter, food, and relief supplies are Red Cross priorities. And blood and platelet donations are needed from people in unaffected areas to make up for canceled drives. Check out the stories below. They’ll show you how the Red Cross is helping.

You Just Gotta Be Strong: a video from the American Red Cross features Terry, a shelter resident who was forced to evacuate his home in Tarboro, North Carolina, because of Hurricane Matthew

Haiti Needs Help from All of Us: an opinion piece from American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern published in Huffington Post addresses rumors, issues, and concerns about disaster relief responses in Haiti

Hurricane Matthew: An Inside Look: a blog post featuring photos and stories about people in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Georgia and South Carolina

Suffering Continues After Hurricane Matthew: a news release from the American Red Cross with details about how the Red Cross is responding to the disaster in the U.S. and in Haiti

From Minnesota, there are 24 Red Cross relief workers deployed to help in the affected areas. More will likely be on their way in the days to come.

Karen and Rick Campion are taking a Red Cross mobile feeding truck from Minnesota to North Carolina where they distribute meals and relief supplies. October, 11, 2016. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross
Karen and Rick Campion are taking a Red Cross mobile feeding truck from Minnesota to North Carolina where they will distribute meals and relief supplies. October 11, 2016. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Please support this relief effort. Click here to donate money to Red Cross disaster relief. Click here to make a blood or platelet donation appointment.

Thank you!

Ready to roll again

“Oh the wonderful, productive chaos of a Red Cross deployment!”

By Kris Posey, Red Cross Twin Cities Area Chapter Disaster Services Volunteer

Kris on a Red Cross mass care vehicle

The first day: one plane trip, one rental car shared with two Red Cross volunteers from Connecticut, and no “room at the inn” because they’d been rented long ago for a Georgia Tech football game. After much effort by Staff Services Lodging volunteers, thirty-four of us were able to drive about twenty miles to a motel for the night. My roommate was from Tennessee. After we determined that I was older–much older–she decided to call me Mom for the remainder of our time together. I loved that!

My second day in Georgia meant a new assignment, a new motel, and a new roommate from Long Island.

The new assignment was working as Staff Support at a satellite Emergency Response Vehicle (ERV) kitchen in a church in Mableton, Georgia, that would be closer to the mobile feeding routes. This meant moving to another motel room (a very nice one thankfully) so the ERV drivers would not need to spend as much time commuting back and forth to the job. We shared the church offices with the Southern Baptists who were there to cook the food that the Red Cross ERV’s delivered. There were 20+ ERV’s working out of this kitchen and the collaboration between Red Cross and Southern Baptists was run like a fine tuned machine!

I had an opportunity to ride on two different ERV runs and see some of the people who were affected by the floods—many of them had nothing much before the floods. They were very appreciative of the two meals a day Red Cross was delivering to them. I was glad that I had attended the “Ready Set Roll” ERV class because I was able to help in a productive way instead of being a third wheel. I knew what to look for when the drivers asked for a spoodle!

After ten days, Red Cross had met the needs of the residents and it was time for everyone to head back home. We out processed all of the drivers and after their ERVs passed the road inspection 20+ ERVs headed back home to places all over the South.

I stayed another three days to finish my assignment at Red Cross Headquarters. Yes, this meant moving to a fourth motel. Then I returned home where I crashed for two days (a given after a deployment) and now I am ready to deploy all over again!